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November 17, 2007

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I always called my mom "Mom" although I guess I could have said "Mommy" before I remember. I love "Mama" though and that's what my kids call me. They've been calling me "Mom" more and more and it makes me sad. My husband and I always refer to me as "Mama" when we talk to my kids so hopefully it'll come back into fashion.

I love "Mama" because "Mommy" sounds nasally here where Midwest accents prevail and it's way too easy to whine "Moooooom-eeeeeee!"

My mom was "Mom" - but her mom was her "Mama".

I'm "Mami" - Spanish form of Mama, sounds kind of like "Mommy" but not quite. I love being Mami. My dd puts a heart on the "i" when she writes me notes. They called me "Mama" when they were little.

I'm curious if the pink pancakes were received well.

I'm mommy, except the 2 year old calls me mama. My mother was called mom, or ma.

My mom was always "mom." She called her own mother "mother"...totally indicative of their relationship. ;)

I absolutely cannot stand the word "mommy." It makes me involuntarily cringe in a way that I cannot articulate. I am and always will be "Mama" to my girls.

I'm Mommy--which I don't like, really. although it sounds quite sweet when my little angel says it. She called me Mama when she was little and I refer to myself as Mama, but she switched over to Mommy on her own when she was about 2.5ish. Even though I prefer Mama, I love hearing her call me Mommy. I called my own mother Mom, and probably Mommy when I was little. We also call both parents by a bunch of goofy nicknames--Big Guy and The Timinator for my dad, Janice (not her name) for my mom.

My mom was Mommy and then Mom. I am just Mamamamamamamama to J still. If that.

My husband's mom is Mama to him and his siblings.

I thought that "mama" was what the hip, stylish moms were called. Seriously.

I called my mom Mama, and then Mom, and then when yelling up the stairs, "Ma!" And she signs letters to me as "Ma."

My girls call me Mama or Mom.

yeah, I think Mommy is way more infantilizing than Mama, since the -ee ending is kind of the English version of a diminutive, isn't it?

My almost 3-year old has started calling my husband Dada, after calling him Daddy or Dad since she starting talking. We kind of like it and have started trying to use it ourselves to encourage continued use.

I called my mom Mama, and then Mom, and then when yelling up the stairs, "Ma!" And she signs letters to me as "Ma."

My girls call me Mama or Mom.

yeah, I think Mommy is way more infantilizing than Mama, since the -ee ending is kind of the English version of a diminutive, isn't it?

My almost 3-year old has started calling my husband Dada, after calling him Daddy or Dad since she starting talking. We kind of like it and have started trying to use it ourselves to encourage continued use.

I'm born and raised in the northern Midwest, where the nasal short 'a' will make your ears bleed a little bit, if you're not used to it. ;) Just about everyone here and in my family has been "Mommy," then "Mom." Occasionally I called my mom "Mummy" (it doesn't rhyme with rummy, but I can't describe the 'u' sound) once I was older. Now she's "Mom."

But I always wanted to be called "Mama." I don't like how "Mommy" sounds on me. For others I like it, but not for me. Unfortunately, my husband pressed our daughter to call me "Mommy." When I asked him not to, he couldn't seem to verbalize why he preferred it, but I think he falls into the "Mama=infantile" camp. His reasoning was that she had progressed past the "Da Da Da" stage and now said "Daddy," so the maternal name should follow suit. On this one, he had to have his way despite my preferences, so now my daughter calls me "Mommy" and I continue to refer to myself as "Mama."

For the record, he is also born and raised in northern Midwest, so I'm not even sure it's a regional thing.

I come at this from a different perspective. Mommy is what I am called. I called my mother that until I was older when I switched to just Mom. My kids switch between Mommy and Mama.

I despise being called Mama, because in my mind it is not a sweet Mama. The word to me is Momma, as in Throw Momma from the Train or Big Momma's House. A momma (probably solely to me) is one who is only tolerated by her children. Her behavior is less than desired and even embarrassing.

And if Mommy is infantizing, then what is Daddy?

How in the world is "mama" more infantilizing than "mommy"?

My boy doesn't talk yet, but I am doing my best to be Mama rather than Mommy. The only thing I don't like about Mama is that it sounds like Momma (which has similar connotations for me as it does for Sarabeth.)

I call my parents by their first names.

I called my mother "Mommy" when I was a kid, and I call her "Mom" now, although my eldest brother calls her "Ma".

I usually refer to myself as mama or mommy interchangeably, although I think I prefer Mama. Maybe because it's less common? I don't know.

I may have called my mom "mommy" when I was little, but most of the time growing up she was "Mom" or more commonly "Ma".

My kids call me both "mommy" and "mama", it kind of depends on their mood, I guess. I just asked them "Who am I?" and they both said "Mommy!" so, I guess that answers the question more directly.

My husband is usually "Daddy" or "Da".

I am SO with you on this one, CJ. I hate being called Mommy. To me, "Mommy" is the term that invokes the dumpy, frumpy, snot on the knees of her sweatpants image. "Mama," on the other hand, sounds like the later half of the phrase "hot mama." Plus, it's more international than Mommy, which is (I think) an exclusively American term.

I call my own mother Mom, and she called her UK-born mother Mum.

I also HATE Mommy. Ok, that may be putting it a bit too strongly. But it sounds infantalizing to me, and whiny, and I don't know, irritating. I am Mama when I get a choice, but my daughter is getting inexorably acculturated and calls me Mom or Mommy sometimes. I haven't decided how I feel about trying to convince her to otherwise. Actually I'd love to convince her but I know that if I show the hint of a preference for Mama she'll never utter it again.

My mother was Mummy until she was Mom, and she called her mother Mummy exclusively. My grandmother called her mother Mother to the best of my recollection. She was a very proper high society matron, so I guess it fit.

Is that ma-ma with short a sounds, equally stressed or ma-MAH with a short a and then a long one, stressed on the second syllable? The latter would be posh English usage (think Nancy Mitford types in pearls) and rather old fashioned. I can think of a few children who call their mother mama, but not many. None that would say ma-MAH. Mostly in England it's Mum or Mummy. My mother is Mummy to me, or occasionally Mutti (German for mother) and my father is Daddy. Mummy and Daddy are often seen as slightly babyish names and therefore a bit embarassing to call your parents in public once past puberty, so I think quite a few people would say "my mum" when referring to her in public, but call her "mummy" in private.
I wouldn't say there was much infantalising of the mother implied in 'mummy'. It's often seen in the phrase 'yummy mummy' i.e. a stylish, fashionable, thin, usually middle class mother with impecably turned out children and faultless in every area of life. There's a Times Saturday magazine column which parodies this as 'Slummy Mummy', i.e. someone who's as disorganised and grubby as the rest of us.
Thinking about it, 'Mummy' is probably a middle-class word, broadly. 'Mum' would be working class, 'Mother' or 'Ma-mah' or 'Mater' slightly old-fashioned upper class.

I call my mother Mom. My boys call me Mama, and will correct those who erroneously refer to me as Mommy, also.

Who doesn't love to weigh in on the "mommy" debate? My siblings and I all called our mom "mommy" until we decided we were too old - now we all call her "mom."

Personally, I never quite liked "mommy" for myself; my reasons are most likely rooted in some of the issues I've had with my mom over the years. So when my son was born, I referred to myself as both "mama" and "mummy"; he picked up on the latter, and I follow suit most of the time ;).

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